Skip to content

MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION

MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION

FW 2020

 

It was a return to simplicity for Michael Kors at his Fall 2020 Ready to Wear show during New York Fashion Week, an ode to a slower pace of life, of rustic charm, and perfecting wardrobe staples for the urban dweller. Models paraded down a runway of raw wood planks, transforming the American Stock Exchange venue into a country barn setting, complete with the crooning twang of musician Orville Peck serenading the audience about the “Dead of Night” from behind his fringed mask

Impeccably tailored coats and capes stomped down the runway atop polished riding boots; chunky oversized sweaters with attached scarves were paired with slinky skirts; plaids and tweets mingled alongside metallic dresses. The neutral palette was dotted by vibrant pops of orange, red and yellow, the colors of fall against a stormy background of greys and blacks. Model Adut Akech appeared in a luxurious khaki ensemble of turtleneck sweater, belted with tan leather, over a calf-length skirt with a thigh-high slit. The look was capped with a white denim vest, lined with fluffy faux fur, a perfect example of how the rich do rustic. The same skirt appeared in heather grey with a monochromatic ensemble consisting of a delicious bell-sleeved zipped up sweatshirt atop a grey turtleneck sweater and matching grey gloves, boots, and cross-body satchel. Tailoring ranged from sharp, with smart day suits and outerwear, to relaxed weekend looks and draped silhouettes.

In a nod back to his first show in 1984, Kors sent male and female models down the runway in matching ensembles, a statement he made decades ago which still finds itself relevant in today’s culture of gender fluidity. A pair of matching black capes appeared on model Mica Argañaraz and her curly-haired male counterpart. Shearling jackets covered white sweaters and light washed baggy jeans on models Malick Bodian and Achenrin Madit. And finally, a pair of slouchy grey suits appeared, belted at the waist with the strap left long to dangle down the side.

By Elizabeth Kramsky